May 19, 2020

Shopify revenues up 71% in Q4 2017

Shopify
Ecommerce
revenue
Q4 2017
zaymalz malz
2 min
Shopify revenues up 71% in Q4 2017

Leading Canadian ecommerce platform Shopify revealed strong performance in its latest quarterly earnings review, with revenues up 71% for the three months ended 31 December compared to 2016.

The firm’s Revenue totalled $222.8mn, up from the $130.4mn recorded for the quarter one year earlier.

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This growth resulted in the firm only making a $3mn loss, equating to approximately $0.03 per share, compared to a $8.9mn loss during the same period last year.

“That our merchants sold more in the fourth quarter than in all of 2015, achieving one billion dollars of this in just four days, speaks to how far we have come in the past few years,” said Russ Jones, Shopify’s Chief Financial Officer.

“Our leadership role in commerce, together with the scale we have achieved, position us well to invest in our next phase of growth: one marked by expansion of our capabilities upmarket and down, in retail, in our ecosystem, and internationally.” 

Shopify is continuing to expand, most recently having signed a deal with the Ontario government that will see cannabis being distributed on Shopify’s ecommerce platform and within its stores, setting the firm up to become the province’s sole distributor of recreational cannabis.

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Jul 30, 2021

CB Insights: US Insurtechs Compete In A Now Global Market

CBInsights
Insurtech
wefox
Finance
2 min
Tech market intelligence platform CB Insights highlights that 2021 insurtech funding is less dominated by US firms and more geographically diverse

In the first half of the year, insurtech companies around the world have raised US$7.4bn, nearly doubling their funding in Q2. According to Digital Insurance, insurtechs have raised US$4.8bn in Q2—an 89% increase in funding from Q1. But US firms are no longer the sole beneficiaries. 

What Are the Stats? 

Out of the 15 Q2 mega-rounds—those that top US$100mn—only eight included American firms. Pretty good, you might say. That’s over half! But US companies only made up 38% of the deals, which marks a 10% drop from Q1 and a 12% drop from 2020. Technically, therefore, US insurtechs are less influential than they’ve been in the past. But who says this is a bad development? 

 

Despite my American citizenship, I’d argue that a more globally diverse insurance market is only for the best. Many of the world’s citizens who could most benefit from improved insurance services live outside of the States—and deserve local, tech-savvy services. 

Why Does This Matter? 

You’re always going to see the typical insurtech contenders from Western countries. For instance: 

 

 

But it’s critical that we address risk across the world. American insurtechs might be some of the most technologically skilled firms in the industry, but it’s not their first goal to address floods in Southeast Asia, crop destruction in China, and COVID complications in South Africa. That’s why we should celebrate that the recent Q2 round included insurtechs from 35 different countries

 

According to CB Insights’ Q2 2021 Quarterly InsurTech Briefing, this was the first time that they’d observed insurtech activity in Botswana, Mali, Romania, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey. And ‘from a product, service, distribution, and underlying risk perspective, we—as a society and as an industry—are moving at an unprecedented speed’, says Dr. Andrew Johnston, Global Head of Willis Re InsurTech

 

Just ask CB Insights. InsurTech value propositions have resonated with the world. 

 

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