May 19, 2020

Lucky Thirteen: Marketing Trends for 2013

Branding
Marketing
marketing trends
2013 forecast
Bizclik Editor
5 min
Lucky Thirteen: Marketing Trends for 2013

Written by: Robert Passikoff, Ph.D., founder and president, Brand Keys

The New Year, 2013, approaches. And as everyone knows, the number 13 holds great symbolism. For the religious among us there were the 13 guests at the Last Supper and the 13 tribes of Israel. Scientists know the Universe is governed by 13 fundamental constants of physics, and the relationship between the volume of the Earth and the Sun is 1310. For shoppers there’s added value of 13 items comprising a “baker’s dozen.” Anthropologists study the 13 skies of the Aztecs. 

But for marketers and brand managers who want to look beyond the horizon, Brand Keys’ validated, predictive loyalty and engagement metrics have identified 13 critical trends for 2013:

1. The Expectation Economy
Over the past decade, customer expectations have increased on average by 28%. But brands in all categories overall have kept up by only 8%, which anyone at the checkout counter can tell you is an awfully big gap between what brands offer and what customers desire. Accurate measures of real, often hidden, expectations provide significant advantages to brands that understand their value and point to how to delight customers.

2. Me-tail
The consumers’ heightened awareness of their actual control, added to the commoditization of brands and products, equals a significant segment of consumers craving customized and personalized products and services (see success of Pinterest). Customization will become an even more important brand differentiator, with returns-on-investments of loyalty and profitability made-to-order for your brand.

3. (E)tail Everywhere
Along with consumer expectations, online retailing increases daily. But increases in brand equity, and usage among online retailers, will come with consumers’ desires to be constantly connected to these brands. Brands will have to watch for online retail pop-up stores, like Amazon, and physical kiosks for brands like Groupon, and think in terms of broader access.

4. Siri-ously Soon
Voice assistance – or more accurately, voice assistants – will become more the rule than the exception. Such applications will be designed and incorporated into more devices to meet consumers’ increasing expectations for immediate and customized support in all forms of outreach.

5. The Known and the Branded
Real brands will become rarer. Examples of brands that delight consumers have become the yardstick to evaluate all products and services. While we may still call them brands, consumers think of them as category placeholders: stuff that doesn’t stand for anything. Understanding what will turn consumers into fans will provide a foundation for meaningful differentiation.

6. Story Telling Tales
Brands that seek differentiation and wish to establish emotional connections that produce consumer engagement will need to get better at storytelling. Understanding where the gaps exist between emotional aspects of the brand’s category ideal and how the brand is seen by consumers, can provide opportunities to identify unique stories, histories and tales that will differentiate, entertain, and engage.

7. It’s Not Going to Get Any Easier Being Green
Producing, selling, and shopping based on environmentally “green” production and design, fair-trade and socially conscious consumption is on the rise. But given ease of consumer outreach and their ability to pull back the brand curtain, watch for significant increases in total sustainability and corporate responsibility in the consumers’ decision process.

8. Social Susceptibility
Watch for greater influences of engagement and purchase habits via friends and social networks. Brands will have to factor in the reality that peer-to-peer communications come in three varieties: good, bad, and bland. This makes companies more susceptible to consumer indifference, their conversations and social interactions. Already brands are watching the “de-friending,” or worse –negative news or outright bad evaluations about the brand. The brands that make it here will know the "how" of this consumer-controlled space.

9. Mobile Screen Tests
Mobile devices will become mainstream testing retailers on those screens. Brands must prepare to accommodate this trend, as consumers will rely more upon screens to engage with brands and guide purchase decisions. Brands will need to create carefully targeted campaigns for this platform and provide screen-friendly promotional materials and retail sites.

10. App Savants
Consumers will take greater advantage of applications. But this year those typically small, specialized programs downloaded into mobile devices will move beyond games, GPS, and media, to more personalized applications that monitor, remind, suggest, learn, and know their users’ profiles and preferences. Brands will need to make greater use of such emotional and intimate connections.

11. Facebook Is a Given
With brand ubiquity on the largest social network, recognition will be the least of a brand’s concerns. The question is not, “should I be on Facebook,” but has now become “what should I do on Facebook?” Brands will have to graduate from posting pictures, collecting friends, and/or offering coupons. But doing so will depend on the category in which the brand competes and where social networks make themselves strategically felt in the category. 

12. Saturation Leveling
It’s no secret that there are more products and services using more platforms and outreach streams with the marketplace dangerously close to saturation with marketing messaging. But just because it's different, doesn't mean it's differentiating. Brands will have to plan and research engaging pre-launch activities if they wish to level the playing field and earn a high engagement-to-effort return on their investments.

13. Engagement Empowers
Non-engaged customers are a brand's most vulnerable assets. Period. Marketers need to engage all along the journey, from engaging platforms, programs, messages, or experiences. Brands must keep their eye on the prize when using any of these engagement methods, however. It's all about meeting the ultimate goal of increasing brand engagement.

By the way, the number 13 is also thought by some to be unlucky. And we agree, but only those brands that ignore these trends will face direct consequences to the success or failure of branding, engagement, and marketing efforts in 2013.
 

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Jun 23, 2021

Sutherland Healthcare helps digitize human experiences

Northwell Health
Sutherland Global
3 min
Engineer human healthcare experiences that truly matter with Sutherland Healthcare

Sutherland Healthcare is a partner in your quest to achieve the Quadruple Aim of improving patient experience, clinical experience, and health outcomes—while lowering costs. They help optimise the value potential of the technologies at hand, remapping existing processes into end-to-end solutions that advance the art of the possible. 

Exposing clients to the value of automation and analytics, Sutherland Healthcare ramps up those capabilities into “service as opportunity” as appetite and ability permit. They free up capital, energy and leadership attention for core competencies and leverage what others can do better, growing their client teams’ skills and capabilities for future success. 

“We serve clients from back-office processes, through to the end-of-customer experience and along the way, leverage big data and deep analytics,” said Matthew Collier, CEO of Sutherland Healthcare.

“We bring a deep domain expertise to each industry, particularly in healthcare,” commented Collier who stresses they meet their clients wherever they are on their digital transformation journey. “From the earliest spectrum of outsourcing through to the point of cloud, we can meet them.”

Founded in 1986, Sutherland Healthcare is a global organisation with over 15 locations and 5000+ employees including healthcare development, analytics and data science teams. With an average Net Promoter Score (NPS) of 80, Sutherland Healthcare uses proprietary analytics, omnichannel and back-office platforms, bots and tools.  They work with six of the top 10 US health plans and more than 100 health industry clients – from stand-alone hospitals to large health systems and medtech companies.

For 12 years, Sutherland has been a partner of Northwell Health - New York’s largest health system serving 11 million people.  

“This has been a true partnership and the outcomes have been really impressive,” said Collier who pointed out the following savings:

  • 15 per cent year over year cash collections
  • 37 per cent reduction in bad debt 
  • 18 per cent decrease in average AR days 
  • 15 per cent increase in our engagement 

The company heritage of being a “future-ready organisation” came to fruition during the pandemic. “By having deeply digital technology enabled service in the RCM arena, we were able to flex up and down with demands from clients,” said Collier.

“Most health systems will tell you that their data is a gold mine both for clinical benefit and economic value.  A more apt description is that it is like an underground oil field which is not very useful. But by partnering with us we can help extract that oil and put that data in the cloud. We can help to refine that oil using our proprietary data monetisation tools to make that data interoperable.”

“Within the first three weeks of COVID-19 we had everyone globally working from home. A treasure trove of technologies enabled us to do that effectively while safeguarding  Protected Health Information (PHI). 

“Sutherland is at its heart, a tech enabled services company and that gives us the edge when the best solution is neither a technology or services solution, but rather the hybrid of the two.”

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