May 19, 2020

Ross Levinsohn named CEO and publisher of LA Times

publishing
Ross Levinsohn
Leadership
CEO
shivraj seo
2 min
Ross Levinsohn named CEO and publisher of LA Times

Tronc Inc., the Chicago-based newspaper publisher, has undergone a broad management shakeup, naming media veteran Ross Levinsohn as the new chief executive and publisher of the LA Times.

Levinsohn, who had a top role at Fox Interactive Media and served as interim CEO at Yahoo, becomes The Times’ 17th publisher and the fifth in the last decade.

Jim Kirk, a veteran news executive, who was the former publisher and editor of the Chicago Sun-Times, was named interim executive editor of the Times.

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The pair replace Davan Maharaj at the 150-year news publication. Maharaj served as the Time’s top editor since 2011 and added publisher to his title in 2016.

Three other senior editors were also terminated on Monday morning: Managing Editor Marc Duvoisin, Deputy Managing Editor for Digital Megan Garvey and Assistant Managing Editor of Investigations Matt Doig.

Like other newspapers, the Times has struggled to compete in the digital market and has been reducing staff for years. Covering the staff shake-up, the flagship newspaper described how the leaders were taking over a company with a “flagging morale after years of management changes on top of huge shifts in consumer behaviour that have roiled the entire newspaper industry.”

In an interview, Levinsohn said: “The Los Angeles Times is a beacon of journalism and one of the most important voices in media, and I am honored and humbled to lead this world-class media enterprise.”

“I look forward to working with the talented teams to expand our footprint, advance Tronc’s digital transformation and further cement our role as a trusted source of news and information.

“We have global ambitions for this brand, and I believe the Los Angeles Times has the potential to further expand and deepen its societal and cultural impact regionally, nationally and around the world.”

Tronc Inc., formerly known as  Tribune Publishing, owns a wide portfolio of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune newspapers. The company changed its name last year to Tronc Inc. as a nod to the publisher's transformation into a more digitally-savvy company.

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May 12, 2021

How innovation is transforming government

United States Air Force
Leidos
Bizclik Editor
3 min
Leidos is a global leader in the development and application of technology to solve their customers’ most demanding challenges.

According to Washington Technology’s Top 100 list, Leidos is the largest IT provider to the government. But as Lieutenant General William J. Bender explains, “that barely scratches the surface” of the company’s portfolio and drive for innovation.

Bender, who spent three and a half decades in the military, including a stint as the U.S. Air Force’s Chief Information Officer (CIO), has seen action in the field and in technology during that time, and it runs in the family. Bender’s son is an F-16 instructor pilot. So it stands to reason Bender Senior intends to ensure a thriving technological base for the U.S. Air Force. “What we’re really doing here is transforming the federal government from the industrial age into the information age and doing it hand-in-hand with industry,” he says.

The significant changes that have taken place in the wider technology world are precisely the capabilities Leidos is trying to pilot the U.S. Air Force through. It boils down to developing cyberspace as a new domain of battle, globally connected and constantly challenged by the threat of cybersecurity attacks.

“We recognize the importance of the U.S. Air Force’s missions,” says Bender, “and making sure they achieve those missions. We sit side-by-side with the air combat command, intelligence surveillance, and reconnaissance infrastructure across the Air Force. There are multiple large programs where the Air Force is partnering with Leidos to ensure their mission is successfully accomplished 24/7/365. In this company, we’re all in on making sure there’s no drop in capability.”

That partnership relies on a shared understanding of delivering successful national security outcomes, really understanding the mission at hand, and Leidos’ long-standing relationship of over 50 years with the federal government.

To look at where technology is going, Bender thinks it is important to look back at the last 10 to 15 years. “What we’ve seen is a complete shift in how technology gets developed,” he says. “It used to be that the government invested aggressively in research and development, and some of those technologies, once they were launched in a military context, would find their way into the commercial space. That has shifted almost a hundred percent now, where the bulk of the research and development dollars and the development of tech-explicit technologies takes place in the commercial sector.”

“There’s a long-standing desire to adopt commercial technology into defense applications, but it’s had a hard time crossing the ‘valley of death’ [government slang for commercial technologies and partnerships that fail to effectively transition into government missions]. Increasingly we’re able to do that. We need to look at open architectures and open systems for a true plug-and-play capability. Instead of buying it now and trying to guess what it’s going to be used for 12 years from now, it should be evolving iteratively.”

 

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