May 19, 2020

Top Six Stories from the NFL Playoffs

Leadership
Super Bowl
NFL
Business
Adam Stone
5 min
Top Six Stories from the NFL Playoffs

1. #SHRINKAGE

After an impressive 45-7 victory over the Indianapolis Colts, Bill Belichick and the New England Patriots find themselves in the middle of another controversy. According to NFL league sources, 11 of the 12 balls used by the Patriots during Sunday’s game were significantly under-inflated, which would provide better grip to their QB Tom Brady and other players.

It is unclear at this point how the balls became deflated; the Colts protested after a 2nd quarter interception thrown by Brady. This is only a few seasons removed from being punished for “Spygate,” where Patriots’ officials were caught spying on the practice sessions for the New York Jets in an attempt to gain an unfair competitive advantage. There, the NFL punished the Patriots by taking away some of their draft picks in the following year’s NFL Draft. Here, it is possible that the punishment could be unprecedented. Since “Spygate,” we have seen “Bountygate,” another controversy that surrounded the New Orleans Saints and their culture to incentivize players for injuring the other team’s top players.

That scandal resulted in the NFL suspending Saints’ head coach Sean Payton for an entire season. Since Belichick is a previous offender in the eyes of the NFL, suspensions for the upcoming Super Bowl and next season are more than possible, in addition to other fines and draft pick considerations. The Patriots may be facing an uphill battle just for trying to get a grip.

2. TOP SEEDS RULE

With an exciting 4th-quarter comeback, the Seattle Seahawks are now poised to defend their title after defeating the Green Bay Packers in overtime to win the NFC Championship. The New England Patriots smacked the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC Championship to play in their 6th Super Bowl since 2002.

Related: Eight Unforgettable Super Bowl Commercials 

Both teams battled through early-season struggles and crushed teams late in the season; New England averaged 40 points per game in their two playoff wins, while Seattle gave up only 9.8 points per game since week 12 (all victories).

New England looks to bounce back from recent Super Bowl losses to capture its first since 2005, whereas the Seahawks look to become the first back-to-back champions since the Patriots’ last win in Super Bowl XXXIX. The rushing stats of Russell Wilson and Marshawn Lynch will be a key factor to the game: Seattle averaged 178 rushing yards in wins this year, 132 in losses. New England only allowed 104 rushing yards per game this season and should be able to do enough against the Legion of Boom to squeak out a 26-23 win in Glendale. 

3. BIG DECISIONS LOOMING IN THE OFFSEASON

With fans still questioning how Green Bay collapsed late in the NFC Championship game and why Indianapolis looked so overmatched in its championship matchup, every other eliminated team is beginning to tackle its own offseason priorities. Right now represents the calm before the storm as many prominent players, including Detroit Lion defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh, will be able to void their current contracts and become free agents soon after this year’s Super Bowl. Other “impact” free agents include:

  • Marshawn Lynch
  • Dez Bryant
  • DeMarco Murray
  • Randall Cobb
  • Darrelle Revis

This pool of free agents will aid the NFL’s goal for league parody. Expect the Oakland Raiders and New York Jets to be big players in free agency.

4. BETTER PIZZA. BETTER RETIRE?

After another disappointing playoff finish, Peyton Manning is answering more questions about whether or not he should retire. Although Manning will be entering his 18th season next year, the Denver Broncos have shown a renewed commitment to Manning by firing head coach John Fox (46-18 regular season record in his four years with Denver) without displaying any indication of replacing their quarterback. Denver’s vote of confidence may be misplaced because Manning declined as the season progressed and the team found success becoming more run- and defense-oriented.

Related: Top 10 Sports Franchise Owners

Since 2012, Manning has become a face for Papa John’s Pizza after purchasing over 20 franchise locations. With a clear exit strategy in place, it is unknown how long Manning will continue taking tough losses in pursuit of his 2nd Super Bowl title. Looking forward, the Broncos could have a different cast on offense with both receiver Demaryius Thomas and tight end Julius Thomas entering free agency.

5. NEW FACES IN NEW PLACES

The 2014 NFL season may still be about two weeks away from completion but several teams have already made key changes to improve their chances for next season. The Jim Harbaugh saga in San Fran finally ended with taking the job to become head coach of the Michigan Wolverines. On the other coast, Rex Ryan stayed in the AFC East as the head coach of the Buffalo Bills. Here are some of the other head coach hirings made this postseason:

  • Gary Kubiak (Denver)
  • Jim Tomsula (San Francisco)
  • Jack Del Rio (Oakland)
  • John Fox (Chicago)
  • Todd Bowles (New York Jets)

Teams have also been active hiring and firing their assistant coaches and coordinators. It will be interesting to see how these moves and others will impact free agency and future NFL seasons.

Related: Top Super Bowl Commercials of XLVII

6. THE HOUSE ALWAYS WINS

On February 1, 2015, Super Bowl XLIX will take place in Glendale, Arizona at the University of Phoenix Stadium. This is the 2nd time that this site has hosted a Super Bowl; think back to the infamous (Eli) Manning-to-Tyree play that ended New England’s undefeated season back in 2008.

Related: Top 10 NFL Managers

According to a 2013 study conducted by PriceWaterhouseCooper, Glendale experienced an economic boost of just under $200 million as Super Bowl XLII host. The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee estimates that the economic boost from this year’s Super Bowl will be even greater. Residents in Los Angeles and San Diego should take note as they debate whether to provide the financial support needed to get new stadiums built in their cities. 

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Click here to read the January 2015 issue of Business Review USA

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Jun 13, 2021

Marketing matters: from IBM to Kyndryl

CMO
Kyndryl
IBM
Leadership
Kate Birch
5 min
Former CMO for IBM Americas Maria Bartolome Winans was recently named CMO for Kyndryl. Maria talks about her new role and her leadership style

Former Chief Marketing Officer for IBM Americas, and an IBM veteran of more than 25 years, Maria Bartolome Winans was recently named CMO for Kyndryl.

Prior to joining Kyndryl as Chief Marketing Officer, Maria had a 25-year career at IBM, most recently as the tech giant’s CMO where she oversaw all marketing professionals and activities across North America, Canada and Latin America. She has held senior global marketing positions in a variety of disciplines and business units across IBM, most notably strategic initiatives in Smarter Cities and Watson Customer Engagement, as well as leading teams in services, business analytics, and mobile and industry solutions. She is known for her work with teams to leverage data, analytics and cloud technologies to build deeper engagements with customers and partners.

With a passion for marketing, business and people, and a recognized expert in data-driven marketing and brand engagement, Maria talks to Business Chief about her new role, her leadership style and what success means to her.

You've recently moved from IBM to Kyndryl, joining as CMO. Tell us about this exciting new role?

I’m Chief Marketing Officer for Kyndryl, the independent company that will be created following the separation from IBM of its Managed Infrastructure Services business, expected to occur by the end of 2021. My role is to plan, develop, and execute Kyndryl's marketing and advertising initiatives. This includes building a company culture and brand identity on which we base our marketing and advertising strategy.

We have an amazing opportunity ahead at Kyndryl to create a company brand that will stand apart in the market by leading with our people first. Once we are an independent company, each Kyndryl employee will advance the vital systems that power human progress. Our people are devoted, restless, empathetic, and anticipatory – key qualities needed as we build on existing customer relationships and cultivate new ones. Our people are at the heart of this business and I am deeply hopeful and excited for our future.

What experiences have helped prepare you for this new opportunity?

I’ve had a very rich and diverse career history at IBM that has lasted 25+ years. I started out in sales but landed explored opportunities at IBM in different roles, business units, geographies, and functions. Marketing and business are my passions and I landed on Marketing because it allowed me to utilize both my left and right brain, bringing together art and science. In college, I was no tonly a business major, but an art major. I love marketing because I can leverage my extensive knowledge of business, while also being able to think openly and creatively.

The opportunities I was given during my time at IBM and my natural curiosity have led me to the path I’m on now and there’s no better next career step than a once-in-a-lifetime-opportunity to help launch a company. The core of my role at Kyndryl is to create a culture centered on our people and growing up in my career at IBM has allowed me to see first-hand how to prioritize people and ensure they are at the heart of progress in everything Kyndryl will do.

How would you describe your leadership style?

I believe that people aren't your greatest assets, they are your only assets. My platform and background for leadership has always been grounded in authenticity to who I am and centered on diversity and inclusion. I immigrated to the US from Chile when I was 10 years old and so I know the power and beauty that comes from leaning into what makes you different from other people, and that's what I want every person in my marketing organization to feel – the value in bringing their most authentic self to work every day. The way our employees feel when they show up for themselves authentically is how they will also show up for our customers, and strong relationships drive growth.

I think this is especially true in light of a world forever changed by the pandemic. Living through such an unprecedented time has reinforced that we are all humans. We can't lead or care for one another without empathy and I think leaders everywhere have been reminded of this.

What’s the best leadership advice you’ve received?

When I was growing up as an immigrant in North Carolina, I often wanted to be just like everyone else. But my mother always told me: Be unique, be memorable – you have an authentic view and experience of the world that no one else will ever have, so don't try to be anyone else but you.

What does success look like to you?

I think the concept of success is multi-faceted. From a career perspective, being in a job where you're respected and appreciated, and where you can see how your contributions are providing value by motivating your teams to be better – that's success! From a personal perspective, there is no greater accomplishment than investing in the next generation. I love mentoring younger professionals – they are the future. I want my legacy as a leader to include providing value in work culture, but also in leaving a personal impact on the lives of professionals who will carry the workforce forward. Finding a position in life with a job and company that offers me a chance at all of that is what success looks like to me.

What advice would you give to your younger self just starting out in the industry?

I've always been a naturally curious person and it's easy for me to over-commit to projects that pique my interest. I've learned over years of practice how to manage that, so to my younger self I’d say… prioritize the things that are most important, and then become amazing at those things.

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