May 19, 2020

Amazon to Fix Kindle Fire Complaints with Major Update

tablets
Amazon
Kindle Fire
Bizclik Editor
2 min
Amazon to Fix Kindle Fire Complaints with Major Update

 

The Kindle Fire was supposed to be Amazon’s iPad rival, but as it turns out, despite early strong sales, a number of customers have been returning their tablets and complaining about its performance in forums on Amazon’s website.

Amazon has responded to Kindle critics by vowing to issue an update that will improve the Kindle Fire’s speed, touchscreen control and privacy controls.

 “In less than two weeks, we’re rolling out an over-the-air update to Kindle Fire,” Amazon spokesman Drew Herdener told the New York Times.

Users have said that they’re frustrated by the Kindle Fire’s lack of external volume control, slow page loading, touchscreen unresponsiveness and lack of privacy controls. As is, the Kindle Fire doesn’t allow users to keep their recent browsing history private.

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The Amazon forum isn’t full of complaints, though. A handful of users have posted praise for the device, stating that they’re pleased with what the Kindle Fire offers at its low, $199 price point.

 “I have no regrets. Love the interface, the screen, and the lack of hardware buttons--the soft buttons work well for me,” one user wrote. “I've tried and returned several tablets, but this one's a keeper.”

There are no signs that sales for the Kindle Fire have slowed and the new update could potentially provide Amazon with a sales boost.

“Initial market response strongly suggests that Amazon, with the Kindle Fire, has found the right combination of savvy pricing, astute marketing, accessible content and an appropriate business model, positioning the Kindle Fire to appeal to a brand-new set of media tablet buyers,” wrote researcher Rhoda Alexander, in a report for analyst firm IHS.

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May 15, 2021

M&A activity key lever for future tech sector growth

Technology
dealmaking
EY
M&Aactivity
Kate Birch
2 min
With M&A activity in the technology sector soaring, dealmaking is likely to be the key lever for growth as businesses look to recover post-pandemic

Despite the continuing uncertainty of the pandemic, the tech sector has witnessed soaring dealmaking activity over the past year, rocketing in the second half of 2020, with the last quarter of 2020 a record one for M&A activity, and momentum continuing into 2021.

Dealmaking in tech sector soars in past year

And the latest figures bear this out with the number of technology M&A deals totalling US$208.44bn globally in Q1 2021, according to GlobalData. While the US holds top spot both in volume of deals (1034) and total value (US$140.61bn), Europe ranked next with 649 deals (US$44.49bn) with the UK continuing its reign as Europe’s biggest M&A market with 204 deals.

In particular, megadeals – those valued at US$5bn or more – soared in 2020 representing 59% of all global technology sector deal value in 2020, up from 47% in 2019, according to the latest edition of the EY Technology Global Capital Confidence Barometer.

This tech sector trend towards megadeals is backed up by EY’s CCB data, with 16% of tech sector respondents planning to pursue transformative deals valued at US$5bn or more in the near-term.

While technology deal activity “all but stopped at the beginning of 2020 after fluctuating between historic highs and lows, companies pivoted quickly and tech M&A exploded in the second half of the year”, says Barak Ravid, EY Global TMT Leader for Strategy and Transactions. 

M&A activity level for tech sector growth

Looking ahead to the future, technology executives are optimistic, with nearly half (47%) expecting profitability to fully rebound this year, according to CCB data, compared to 23% across all sectors, and with more than half (51%) planning to pursue M&A in the next year in order to sustain growth.

According to Ravid, M&A activity is increasingly becoming a key lever for growth as businesses look to recover.

“To position themselves for future revenue growth, tech companies are now adjusting their M&A strategy to focus more on a target’s business resilience, digital technology alignment and to gain market share through consolidation,” says Ravid.

However, with an increasingly competitive deal market and ongoing geopolitical tensions, the majority of tech execs expect to see more competition in the bidding process for assets over the next year, primarily from private capital.

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