May 19, 2020

Apple puts Mac OS X Lion on market

Apple
iCloud
Mac OS X Lion
Mac App Store
Bizclik Editor
2 min
Apple puts Mac OS X Lion on market

 

It’s a big day for Apple fans and stakeholders not only because of the company’s impressive profits and market share, but also because of today’s release of the Mac OS X Lion in the Mac App Store. As promised, the new operating system will sell for $29.99.

Apple took on a novel idea when it came to the Mac OS X Lion approach because its customers won’t have to drive down to their local Apple Store to purchase a copy of the program for Intel-based Apple laptops and desktops. Mac OS X Lion offers more than 250 new features and is only available as a digital download. While the idea of a digital download may sound scary for some consumers who are less tech savvy, Apple store employees will also be able to assist with the downloading of Lion if they come into a retail outlet.

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Lion offers some pretty impressive features, including new multi-touch trackpad features, including scrolling speed that varies on how you flick your fingers and also offers the same finger tracking navigation similar to that of the iPad and iPhone. New security features will also be part of the Lion offerings. Auto-saving with the closure of a program is also a new feature, along with full-screen views and features to organize and view apps.

Apple also announced a version of the MacBook Air using that software will be in stores tomorrow, priced at $999 and higher. An updated model of the Mac mini will also be in stores tomorrow, at a starting price of $599. Later this year, it will release its iCloud service, which lets users store, synchronize and access music, pictures and documents from different Apple devices.

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May 14, 2021

Driving Federal IT Transformation

U.S Air Force
Dell
Dell Technologies
2 min
Dell Technologies and the USAF: partners in IT modernization.

Dell Technologies and the U.S. Air Force have a longstanding partnership. On several programs of record, Dell Technologies supports mission-oriented areas, including providing data-centric applications for platforms that the Air Force leverages in testing and operations. For example, certain high-performance jet fighters rely on Dell Technologies software that helps provide critical information about aircraft performance to the service and the aircraft manufacturer. After a test flight, data modules gathered from the aircraft’s sensors are downloaded, processed and analyzed to provide critical insights.

The Air Force has also made a concerted effort to drive technology to the edge so that warfighters can gain value from their data where it lives. Dell Technologies is enabling dynamic decision-making at the edge, where collection, management, analysis, and the distribution of data is critical. Dell Technologies’ software factories are supporting some of the largest Air Force programs, like Kessel Run and Kobayashi Maru.

Kobayashi Maru is a cloud-based program designed to modernize the way the Air Force (now the U.S. Space Force) interacts with its allies. By the time Kobayashi Maru was a program, the service had a year or two of experience with the highly successful Kessel Run. According to the Air Force, this continuous user-centered approach enabled warfighters to quickly evaluate software improvements, provide direct feedback to Kessel Run developers, and rapidly iterate the software to provide maximum value and impact. Kobayashi Maru operates under the same principle: the existing software procurement process is too slow to satisfy requirements, so leverage best practices and partner with industry (in this case, Dell Technologies) to get new systems into the field as quickly as possible.

The U.S. Air Force is committed to IT modernization, as exemplified by its ability to embrace change and transformation in how critical systems are procured and deployed. And Dell Technologies is committed to supporting the Air Force in its endeavors, so the service will always be ready for what’s next.

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