May 19, 2020

California aims for stricter clean energy targets

California
Energy
Legislation
Renewables
Cinch Translations
2 min
California aims for stricter clean energy targets

The United States government is turning up the pressure on increasing its investment in and use of renewable energy sources. This is true not just at the federal level, but at individual state levels as well—and some of those states have especially good reason to approach the issue with added intensity. California is one such state, and this week its lawmakers are working hard to pass clean energy reforms ahead of the end of the current state legislative session next week.

RELATED CONTENT: Should California strengthen its clean energy partnership with Mexico?

If these reforms pass under SB 350, California will be en route to produce or procure 50 percent of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2020—a significant jump from the state’s already ambitious current target which aims for 33 percent renewable energy by 2020. As International Business Times reports, California’s state Senate passed SB 350 in June, and the legislation is now seeking approval from the state Assembly before it can land at the desk of Governor Jerry Brown to sign.

RELATED CONTENT: US Navy ramps up its renewable energy investment with major Sempra solar partnership

According to this report, California energy companies are already well on their way toward meeting higher renewable energy standards, spurred on by climate change issues that have made conservation a vital priority in the state overall. While opponents are concerned that this could lead to higher energy bills for consumers, proponents are optimistic about the myriad opportunities that this progress could bring:

“If that happens, we’re going to see a lot of job creation that goes with that,” said Bob Keefe, executive director of Environmental Entrepreneurs, a sustainable-business advocacy group. New renewable-energy projects in California created around 3,000 jobs in the first six months of this year, or about 15 percent of the 20,300 jobs created across the country in that period, the organization found in a jobs report published Thursday.

California isn’t the only state in the Union making significant strides toward renewable energy usage—just recently we reported that Hawaii is making plans to rely on 100 percent self-sustaining renewable energy by 2045. But this would certainly put the state in the top ranks of renewable-minded regions.

RELATED CONTENT: Hawaii could run on 100 percent renewable energy by 2045

To meet their goal before the legislative session deadline, California lawmakers must pass SB 350 by September 11.

[SOURCE: International Business Times]

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May 14, 2021

Driving Federal IT Transformation

U.S Air Force
Dell
Dell Technologies
2 min
Dell Technologies and the USAF: partners in IT modernization.

Dell Technologies and the U.S. Air Force have a longstanding partnership. On several programs of record, Dell Technologies supports mission-oriented areas, including providing data-centric applications for platforms that the Air Force leverages in testing and operations. For example, certain high-performance jet fighters rely on Dell Technologies software that helps provide critical information about aircraft performance to the service and the aircraft manufacturer. After a test flight, data modules gathered from the aircraft’s sensors are downloaded, processed and analyzed to provide critical insights.

The Air Force has also made a concerted effort to drive technology to the edge so that warfighters can gain value from their data where it lives. Dell Technologies is enabling dynamic decision-making at the edge, where collection, management, analysis, and the distribution of data is critical. Dell Technologies’ software factories are supporting some of the largest Air Force programs, like Kessel Run and Kobayashi Maru.

Kobayashi Maru is a cloud-based program designed to modernize the way the Air Force (now the U.S. Space Force) interacts with its allies. By the time Kobayashi Maru was a program, the service had a year or two of experience with the highly successful Kessel Run. According to the Air Force, this continuous user-centered approach enabled warfighters to quickly evaluate software improvements, provide direct feedback to Kessel Run developers, and rapidly iterate the software to provide maximum value and impact. Kobayashi Maru operates under the same principle: the existing software procurement process is too slow to satisfy requirements, so leverage best practices and partner with industry (in this case, Dell Technologies) to get new systems into the field as quickly as possible.

The U.S. Air Force is committed to IT modernization, as exemplified by its ability to embrace change and transformation in how critical systems are procured and deployed. And Dell Technologies is committed to supporting the Air Force in its endeavors, so the service will always be ready for what’s next.

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