May 19, 2020

Kaazing Produces Art through Mobile Crowdsourcing

Kaazing
Déambulations app
Ekito
Emmanuelle Mason
Bizclik Editor
2 min
Kaazing Produces Art through Mobile Crowdsourcing

 

Kaazing, a California based technology company, and Ekito recently announced their collaboration on a mobile device art project through use of a mobile application and festival participants.

Turning attendees into moving paintbrushes, the app collected data on movements throughout the festival from participants' smartphones and transmitted the data live on a virtual canvas. The piece was displayed on Kaazing’s website and  in the Tolouse-Matabiau railway station showing live the art piece that was being dynamically created. Created by Emmanuelle Mason, Kaazing and Ekito, the festival crowd turned movement into a work of art.

“We are living in an era where art and technology can combine to create something greater than the sum of its parts,” said Emmanuelle Mason. “On this project, Kaazing's real-time technology enabled us to explore the question of the private path in a common space, something that would not have been possible if the data wasn’t transferred in real-time.”

Participant in the crowdsourced art downloaded an app, Déambulations, that was available for both iPhone and Android smartphones. Powered by Kaazing technology, the app sent attendees movement in real time to the Déambulations website, “weaving together hundreds of thousands of attendees movements simultaneously during the festival and creating a gigantic, live, crowdsourced art project.”

"Toulouse was very pleased to experiment with a beautiful immersive experience through the Artistic project of Emmanuelle Mason, based on Kaazing’s real-time technology,” said Erwane Monthubert  Deputy Mayor of Toulouse, France.  “The project lit up the Novela festival, and participants of the 4th annual festival were excited to be involved in a completely unique experience.”

Kaazing was excited to see the utilization of its technology in creative and new ways. “In order for real-time data applications over the Internet to work, you need technology that is scalable and reliable to receive and deliver data to and from hundreds of thousands of users’ browsers and devices at one time with instant results,” said John Donnelly III, Kaazing EVP “Real time device applications are the cusp of modern innovations, and this project would have not been possible using legacy Web HTTP technology.  We have seen a huge demand for real-time data communication across a wide range of industries and applications such as real-time bidding for stocks and securities, multi-player interactive betting and gaming and truly innovative social marketing projects such as Toulouse.”     

See the art as it was created here:

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Jun 12, 2021

How changing your company's software code can prevent bias

Deltek
diversity
softwarecode
inclusivity
Lisa Roberts, Senior Director ...
3 min
Removing biased terminology from software can help organisations create a more inclusive culture, argues Lisa Roberts, Senior Director of HR at Deltek

Two-third of tech professionals believe organizations aren’t doing enough to address racial inequality. After all, many companies will just hire a DEI consultant, have a few training sessions and call it a day. 

Wanting to take a unique yet impactful approach to DEI, Deltek, the leading global provider of software and solutions for project-based businesses, took a look at  and removed all exclusive terminology in their software code. By removing terms such as ‘master’ and ‘blacklist’ from company coding, Deltek is working to ensure that diversity and inclusion are woven into every aspect of their organization. 

Business Chief North America talks to Lisa Roberts, Senior Director of HR and Leader of Diversity & Inclusion at Deltek to find out more.

Why should businesses today care about removing company bias within their software code?  

We know that words can have a profound impact on people and leave a lasting impression. Many of the words that have been used in a technology environment were created many years ago, and today those words can be harmful to our customers and employees. Businesses should use words that will leave a positive impact and help create a more inclusive culture in their organization

What impact can exclusive terms have on employees? 

Exclusive terms can have a significant impact on employees. It starts with the words we use in our job postings to describe the responsibilities in the position and of course, we also see this in our software code and other areas of the business. Exclusive terminology can be hurtful, and even make employees feel unwelcome. That can impact a person’s desire to join the team, stay at a company, or ultimately decide to leave. All of these critical actions impact the bottom line to the organization.    

Please explain how Deltek has removed bias terminology from its software code

Deltek’s engineering team has removed biased terminology from our products, as well as from our documentation. The terms we focused on first that were easy to identify include blacklist, whitelist, and master/slave relationships in data architecture. We have also made some progress in removing gendered language, such as changing he and she to they in some documentation, as well as heteronormative language. We see this most commonly in pick lists that ask to identify someone as your husband or wife. The work is not done, but we are proud of how far we’ve come with this exercise!

What steps is Deltek taking to ensure biased terminology doesn’t end up in its code in the future?

What we are doing at Deltek, and what other organizations can do, is to put accountability on employees to recognize when this is happening – if you see something, say something! We also listen to feedback our customers give us and have heard their feedback on this topic. Those are both very reactive things of course, but we are also proactive. We have created guidance that identifies words that are more inclusive and also just good practice for communicating in a way that includes and respects others.

What advice would you give to other HR leaders who are looking to enhance DEI efforts within company technology? 

My simple advice is to start with what makes sense to your organization and culture. Doing nothing is worse than doing something. And one of the best places to start is by acknowledging this is not just an HR initiative. Every employee owns the success of D&I efforts, and employees want to help the organization be better. For example, removing bias terminology was an action initiated by our Engineering and Product Strategy teams at Deltek, not HR. You can solicit the voices of employees by asking for feedback in engagement surveys, focus groups, and town halls. We hear great recommendations from employees and take those opportunities to improve. 

 

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