May 19, 2020

Needy Networks

Business
Technology
Social Media
Kate Supino
2 min
Needy Networks

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A corporate network is the virtual lifeblood of any company--through it, data and valuable information (hopefully?!) flow from the far reaches of the Internet down through the company’s system(s) and into the appendages of employees' PCs. As a result, when your network goes down, it can feel as though your company has been paralyzed by a stroke.

What to Do When Your Corporate Network Goes Down

Step 1: Don't panic. Networks sometimes go down in phases, so your employees may be able to salvage their most recent work.

Step 2: Shut down. Stop typing; stop working; stop saving!

Loss Prevention in the Event of a Network Failure

"The quality of your backup system determines how long you'll be down for” wouldn’t be a fair assessment:

If you are smart enough to invest in a solid backup system, you might only be down for an hour, with no data lost.

Read related content on Business Review USA: How to Boost Your Company's Reputation Using Social Networks

 

Solid backup systems include mirror drives and redundant servers, where you simply unplug the downed drive, and plug in the redundant server.

Some things to do once you have a solid backup system are:

Write down the procedure for getting the network back up and running. Make the instructions detailed, and keep several copies around the office. One copy should reside in the server room.

Have a mock run. Choose a weekend and hire a tech person to come in and orchestrate a mock network failure. Run through every step just like it was a fire drill.

Remember, your network won't go down when you don't need it. It will always go down when you most need it, because network problems are most often related to traffic issues.

Preventing Network Failure in the Future

Properly shut down all computers at the end of the day. When you get too many connections, things can come in that overpower your server.

Even screensavers take up network space and having computers constantly trying to get email can unnecessarily use up resources.

Keep up with the automated updates.

These updates are designed to bugs, install important security updates and install patches. You can't let those get behind because then things start happening, like viruses and firewall breaches. When your computers are running different versions of updates, problems can arise.

The best solution is to have a dedicated IT person on staff or on retainer who can help you to ensure that your network is in the best possible health.


About the Author: Kate Supino writes extensively about best business practices.

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May 14, 2021

Driving Federal IT Transformation

U.S Air Force
Dell
Dell Technologies
2 min
Dell Technologies and the USAF: partners in IT modernization.

Dell Technologies and the U.S. Air Force have a longstanding partnership. On several programs of record, Dell Technologies supports mission-oriented areas, including providing data-centric applications for platforms that the Air Force leverages in testing and operations. For example, certain high-performance jet fighters rely on Dell Technologies software that helps provide critical information about aircraft performance to the service and the aircraft manufacturer. After a test flight, data modules gathered from the aircraft’s sensors are downloaded, processed and analyzed to provide critical insights.

The Air Force has also made a concerted effort to drive technology to the edge so that warfighters can gain value from their data where it lives. Dell Technologies is enabling dynamic decision-making at the edge, where collection, management, analysis, and the distribution of data is critical. Dell Technologies’ software factories are supporting some of the largest Air Force programs, like Kessel Run and Kobayashi Maru.

Kobayashi Maru is a cloud-based program designed to modernize the way the Air Force (now the U.S. Space Force) interacts with its allies. By the time Kobayashi Maru was a program, the service had a year or two of experience with the highly successful Kessel Run. According to the Air Force, this continuous user-centered approach enabled warfighters to quickly evaluate software improvements, provide direct feedback to Kessel Run developers, and rapidly iterate the software to provide maximum value and impact. Kobayashi Maru operates under the same principle: the existing software procurement process is too slow to satisfy requirements, so leverage best practices and partner with industry (in this case, Dell Technologies) to get new systems into the field as quickly as possible.

The U.S. Air Force is committed to IT modernization, as exemplified by its ability to embrace change and transformation in how critical systems are procured and deployed. And Dell Technologies is committed to supporting the Air Force in its endeavors, so the service will always be ready for what’s next.

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