May 19, 2020

What can be learned from the Uber and Intact partnership in Canada?

Technology
Canada
Leadership
Finance
Cutter Slagle
3 min
What can be learned from the Uber and Intact partnership in Canada?

You may not have physically taken an Uber ride, but chances are pretty high that you’ve heard of the famous San Francisco company. And while the app is now offered internationally (and doing quite well), it’s interesting to learn that this ride-sharing experience is making a slight change in Canada: it’s adding a partner.

Originally reported by our sister brand Business Review Canada, Uber and Intact Financial Corporation are coming together to create the very first auto insurance that will be specifically tailored to protect drivers and passengers.

But will this new partnership change the overall Uber experience? And due to the fact that this type of partnership is brand new for Canada, can other worldwide companies learn from it?

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Each company recently released its own separate press release, with Uber saying, “This plan will be the first of its kind designed exclusively for the ride-sharing industry in Canada.”

Intact executive Louis Gagnon added, “With the growing popularity of the sharing and on-demand economy, we are adapting our product range to offer innovative solutions to meet the changing needs of consumers.”

While particular details regarding the partnerships have yet to be revealed, the question remains: how (or will) this change the way you ride?

As of now, it doesn’t seem that anything will change when you order an Uber. Of course, this could change once the deal becomes finalized and details are officially released.

Intact is currently awaiting approval from provincial insurance regulators for its plan before going public. The company’s intention is to offer insurance under the company’s two main brands: Intact Insurance and belairdirect.

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It’s believed that this partnership is taking place in hopes of filling a gap in the industry that currently leaves both passengers and ride-sharing drivers vulnerable. Though Uber has stated that drivers are covered by a commercial policy for up to $5 million worth of bodily injuries and property damage, commercial drivers are still legally required to have their own insurance to cover various claims.

It’s not a stretch to wonder if the price for taking an Uber will increase once the insurance policy goes into effect. However, we won’t know until the deal is officially signed, sealed and delivered.  

Regardless or not if fares increase, it would seem that this new plan is a way to offer full protection for all parties involved in this riding experience. And shouldn’t safety, despite price, be a top priority?

As for other companies learning a thing or two from this new partnership, again, time will tell. While partnerships have been both successful and damaging in the past, it’s hard to say how the one between Uber and Intact will turn out until it actually happens and details on the process are released.

In business, it’s sometimes important to take risks (i.e. begin a new partnership). Therefore, if one thing can be learned from the early stages of this deal, it’s that leaders and executives should never be afraid to get creative and think outside the box.

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[SOURCE: CBC News

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Jun 18, 2021

Intelliwave SiteSense boosts APTIM material tracking

APTIM
Intelliwave
3 min
Intelliwave Technologies outlines how it provides data and visibility benefits for APTIM

“We’ve been engaged with the APTIM team since early 2019 providing SiteSense, our mobile construction SaaS solution, for their maintenance and construction projects, allowing them to track materials and equipment, and manage inventory.

We have been working with the APTIM team to standardize material tracking processes and procedures, ultimately with the goal of reducing the amount of time  spent looking for materials. Industry studies show that better management of materials can lead to a 16% increase in craft labour productivity.

Everyone knows construction is one of the oldest industries but it’s one of the least tech driven comparatively. About 95% of Engineering and Construction data captured goes unused, 13% of working hours are spent looking for data and around 30% of companies have applications that don’t integrate. 

With APTIM, we’re looking at early risk detection, through predictive analysis and forecasting of material constraints, integrating with the ecosystem of software platforms and reporting on real-time data with a ‘field-first’ focus – through initiatives like the Digital Foreman. The APTIM team has seen great wins in the field, utilising bar-code technology, to check in thousands of material items quickly compared to manual methods.

There are three key areas when it comes to successful Materials Management in the software sector – culture, technology, and vendor engagement.

Given the state of world affairs, access to data needs to be off site via the cloud to support remote working conditions, providing a ‘single source of truth’ accessed by many parties; the tech sector is always growing, so companies need faster and more reliable access to this cloud data; digital supply chain initiatives engage vendors a lot earlier in the process to drive collaboration and to engage with their clients, which gives more assurance as there is more emphasis on automating data capture. 

It’s been a challenging period with the pandemic, particularly for the supply chain. Look what happened in the Suez Canal – things can suddenly impact material costs and availability, and you really have to be more efficient to survive and succeed. Virtual system access can solve some issues and you need to look at data access in a wider net.

Solving problems comes down to better visibility, and proactively solving issues with vendors and enabling construction teams to execute their work. The biggest cause of delays is not being able to provide teams with what they need.

On average 2% of materials are lost or re-ordered, which only factors in the material cost, what is not captured is the duplicated effort of procurement, vendor and shipping costs, all of which have an environmental impact.

As things start to stabilise, APTIM continues to utilize SiteSense to boost efficiencies and solve productivity issues proactively. Integrating with 3D/4D modelling is just the precipice of what we can do. Access to data can help you firm up bids to win work, to make better cost estimates, and AI and ML are the next phase, providing an eco-system of tools.

A key focus for Intelliwave and APTIM is to increase the availability of data, whether it’s creating a data warehouse for visualisations or increasing integrations to provide additional value. We want to move to a more of an enterprise usage phase – up to now it’s been project based – so more people can access data in real time.

 

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