May 19, 2020

What If You Could Never Hear About Snooki Again?

Gadgets
Enough Already
Kim Kardashian
Matt Richardson
Bizclik Editor
1 min
What If You Could Never Hear About Snooki Again?

Sometimes after a long day at work all we want to do is turn on the TV, watch our favorite show and relax – not hear the latest updates about Kim Kardashian’s ultra chic and ridiculously expensive wedding. It seems like reality stars and celebrities alike are taking over the world. Not only are they all over the web, but you can’t turn on your TV without hearing the latest celebrity gossip.

But there is a new gadget that may be able to solve this problem. Make’s Matt Richardson has developed a device that mutes his television every time unwanted celebrity chatter comes on. Using basic open-source circuit boards, Richardson was able to build a system that operates by tracking the text in the closed captions that are broadcasted along with the video signals, reports Business Insider.

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This nifty device is called “Enough Already.” So when keywords like “Kardashian” or “The Situation” (or basically any other celebrity that you’re tired of hearing about and want deleted from your viewing experience) appear, the TV automatically mutes for 30 seconds.

While this device was recently developed and hasn’t officially hit the market yet, you can make it yourself. The process is a little tech-intensive, but can be well worth the effort.

Check out this video of Richardson giving a step-by-step tutorial on how to make “Enough Already.”

 

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May 14, 2021

Driving Federal IT Transformation

U.S Air Force
Dell
Dell Technologies
2 min
Dell Technologies and the USAF: partners in IT modernization.

Dell Technologies and the U.S. Air Force have a longstanding partnership. On several programs of record, Dell Technologies supports mission-oriented areas, including providing data-centric applications for platforms that the Air Force leverages in testing and operations. For example, certain high-performance jet fighters rely on Dell Technologies software that helps provide critical information about aircraft performance to the service and the aircraft manufacturer. After a test flight, data modules gathered from the aircraft’s sensors are downloaded, processed and analyzed to provide critical insights.

The Air Force has also made a concerted effort to drive technology to the edge so that warfighters can gain value from their data where it lives. Dell Technologies is enabling dynamic decision-making at the edge, where collection, management, analysis, and the distribution of data is critical. Dell Technologies’ software factories are supporting some of the largest Air Force programs, like Kessel Run and Kobayashi Maru.

Kobayashi Maru is a cloud-based program designed to modernize the way the Air Force (now the U.S. Space Force) interacts with its allies. By the time Kobayashi Maru was a program, the service had a year or two of experience with the highly successful Kessel Run. According to the Air Force, this continuous user-centered approach enabled warfighters to quickly evaluate software improvements, provide direct feedback to Kessel Run developers, and rapidly iterate the software to provide maximum value and impact. Kobayashi Maru operates under the same principle: the existing software procurement process is too slow to satisfy requirements, so leverage best practices and partner with industry (in this case, Dell Technologies) to get new systems into the field as quickly as possible.

The U.S. Air Force is committed to IT modernization, as exemplified by its ability to embrace change and transformation in how critical systems are procured and deployed. And Dell Technologies is committed to supporting the Air Force in its endeavors, so the service will always be ready for what’s next.

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