May 19, 2020

Autodesk announces new range of CAM products for 2017

Autodesk
Computer Aided Manufacturing
Mark Forth
CAM technology
Sumit Modi
4 min
Autodesk announces new range of CAM products for 2017

Autodesk has introduced a new range of industrial manufacturing CAM technology to be released next year.

The company is ushering in its 2017 line of Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) products, including an enhanced version of FeatureCAM for automating CNC programming; PartMaker for precision parts manufacturing; PowerMill for designing complex molds; PowerShape for the design of complex 3D parts; and PowerInspect for hardware-independent inspection software.

Mark Forth, Manager of Manufacturing Industry Strategy at Autodesk, said: “Manufacturers need to iterate and innovate faster than ever before to stay competitive as the marketplace is redefined by a new future of making things. Autodesk’s new 2017 CAM products are designed to help our customers learn, improve and master advanced manufacturing techniques that ultimately lead to better designed and functional products being brought to market more quickly and efficiently.”

Autodesk will outline the full range and company vision during the IMTS 2016 conference in Chicago.

Details of the new CAM products are detailed below: 

FeatureCAM 2017 and PartMaker 2017

Autodesk FeatureCAM is an easy-to-use solution for milling machines, turning and turn/mill centers, and wire electrical discharge machines (EDMs). The automation tools within FeatureCAM help manufacturers reduce programming time, allowing parts to be made faster. They also increase programming consistency for maintaining part quality. The 2017 version of the product includes the following improvements:

 

  • New programming capabilities for dual-path Swiss-type lathes, further improving its range of CNC machine support
  • Ability to import and view product and manufacturing information directly from a model in order to help visualize design specifications
  • Access to functionality that allows pre-drilling when using Vortex toolpaths, ruling out the need for helical ramp moves

 

In addition to the features above, PartMaker 2017, which enables complex, high-precision part manufacturing with Swiss-type lathes, is now available within the FeatureCAM 2017 Ultimate product tier. The two products in combination form a complementary bundle that effectively addresses the programming requirements of today’s manufacturing shops.

“We have a great history working with FeatureCAM, and when we were asked to evaluate the new Swiss lathe functionality, it was a no-brainer for us,” said Bill Karas of Karas Kustoms. “In the past, I had been programming the Swiss machine by hand. Using FeatureCAM for the Swiss machines saves our company a ton of time with excellent results.”

 

PowerMill 2017

Autodesk PowerMill 2017 takes the ability to easily and effectively manufacture the most complex molds, dies and other components to new heights. This latest version includes the following new features:

  • More efficient 3D offset finishing toolpaths, greater simulation controls and constraint-based logic to optimize non-cutting link moves for safer, more efficient machining
  • For the first time, PowerMill also provides strategies to create turning routines for use on 5-axis mill-turn machines

 

These improvements continue to make PowerMill the ideal choice for manufacturers looking to solve the most demanding of 3-axis, high-speed and complex multi-axis applications. 

 

PowerShape 2017

The design of 3D complex parts just became more effective with the following improvements to PowerShape 2017:

  • Accessibility shading to identify areas of a part that cannot be machined with 3-axis machining alone
  • A new rib capping tool allows users of EDM technology to automatically create surfaces in order to stop cutting tools from machining slots that will be produced by EDM. Hundreds of surfaces are created in a single command, saving hours of manual modeling.
  • The PowerShape electrode wizard offers improved EDM hardware integration for shop-floor burning
  • Finally, regular users of reverse engineering tools can benefit from improved fitting of surfaces to imported triangle meshes

 

PowerInspect 2017

Autodesk PowerInspect simplifies the inspection of complex shapes by providing a single solution for a wide range of measuring equipment. PowerInspect 2017 includes the following new features:

  • Support for portable measuring equipment, coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) and On Machine Verification (OMV) are offered in a single package for PowerInspect Ultimate users. This improves productivity and flexibility by making it easier for operators to select the most appropriate measuring equipment for each job.
  • The ViewCube feature offers specific benefits for visualizing inspection results and creating inspection reports
  • A single click mechanism to recall the principal CAD viewpoints, making the creation of consistent inspection report images faster and easier than ever before
  • Improvements to point-cloud performance now allows users to take advantage of the improved capabilities in the latest scanning equipment
  • A dedicated point-cloud single point item provides an easy way to evaluate target points from laser scan data

 

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Jun 12, 2021

How changing your company's software code can prevent bias

Deltek
diversity
softwarecode
inclusivity
Lisa Roberts, Senior Director ...
3 min
Removing biased terminology from software can help organisations create a more inclusive culture, argues Lisa Roberts, Senior Director of HR at Deltek

Two-third of tech professionals believe organizations aren’t doing enough to address racial inequality. After all, many companies will just hire a DEI consultant, have a few training sessions and call it a day. 

Wanting to take a unique yet impactful approach to DEI, Deltek, the leading global provider of software and solutions for project-based businesses, took a look at  and removed all exclusive terminology in their software code. By removing terms such as ‘master’ and ‘blacklist’ from company coding, Deltek is working to ensure that diversity and inclusion are woven into every aspect of their organization. 

Business Chief North America talks to Lisa Roberts, Senior Director of HR and Leader of Diversity & Inclusion at Deltek to find out more.

Why should businesses today care about removing company bias within their software code?  

We know that words can have a profound impact on people and leave a lasting impression. Many of the words that have been used in a technology environment were created many years ago, and today those words can be harmful to our customers and employees. Businesses should use words that will leave a positive impact and help create a more inclusive culture in their organization

What impact can exclusive terms have on employees? 

Exclusive terms can have a significant impact on employees. It starts with the words we use in our job postings to describe the responsibilities in the position and of course, we also see this in our software code and other areas of the business. Exclusive terminology can be hurtful, and even make employees feel unwelcome. That can impact a person’s desire to join the team, stay at a company, or ultimately decide to leave. All of these critical actions impact the bottom line to the organization.    

Please explain how Deltek has removed bias terminology from its software code

Deltek’s engineering team has removed biased terminology from our products, as well as from our documentation. The terms we focused on first that were easy to identify include blacklist, whitelist, and master/slave relationships in data architecture. We have also made some progress in removing gendered language, such as changing he and she to they in some documentation, as well as heteronormative language. We see this most commonly in pick lists that ask to identify someone as your husband or wife. The work is not done, but we are proud of how far we’ve come with this exercise!

What steps is Deltek taking to ensure biased terminology doesn’t end up in its code in the future?

What we are doing at Deltek, and what other organizations can do, is to put accountability on employees to recognize when this is happening – if you see something, say something! We also listen to feedback our customers give us and have heard their feedback on this topic. Those are both very reactive things of course, but we are also proactive. We have created guidance that identifies words that are more inclusive and also just good practice for communicating in a way that includes and respects others.

What advice would you give to other HR leaders who are looking to enhance DEI efforts within company technology? 

My simple advice is to start with what makes sense to your organization and culture. Doing nothing is worse than doing something. And one of the best places to start is by acknowledging this is not just an HR initiative. Every employee owns the success of D&I efforts, and employees want to help the organization be better. For example, removing bias terminology was an action initiated by our Engineering and Product Strategy teams at Deltek, not HR. You can solicit the voices of employees by asking for feedback in engagement surveys, focus groups, and town halls. We hear great recommendations from employees and take those opportunities to improve. 

 

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