May 19, 2020

Can fitness trackers compete with the Apple Watch?

healthcare
Apple
Google
Technology
maria collazo
3 min
Can fitness trackers compete with the Apple Watch?

If you haven’t heard already, a Massachusetts teenager has credited the Apple Watch for saving his life after the device alerted him that his heart rate was higher than normal, leading to the diagnosis of a life-threatening condition.

Paul Houle Jr., 18, said he felt back pain after two football practices in one day in the summer heat but didn’t think much of it, according to Huffington Post. Upon returning to his dorm room, however, he checked his heart rate on his new Apple Watch and was immediately alerted to a heart rate of 145 beats per minute—twice the average resting heart rate.

READ RELATED: Were reports of the Apple Watch Edition’s gold consumption greatly exaggerated?

Initially, Houle believed his watch might be broken, but he decided to go to his athletic trainer for a second look.

After being examined by his trainer and the school’s nurse, Houle was taken to the emergency room, where he was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis—a condition in which muscles release a protein that damages vital organs and causes a rapid heart rate.

“Doctors told me that if I had not said anything and [had] gone to practice the next day, I very easily could have died,” Houle told the Huffington Post.

The Apple Watch is not a medical device and cannot be used to diagnose heart conditions, Dr. Allen Taylor told Yahoo! News, but it could potentially alert people to a health problem that should be evaluated.

RELATED TOPIC: Apple and Samsung remain the top smartphones, but for how much longer?

According to Apple, the watch uses LED lights and light-sensitive photodiodes to detect blood blood flow in the user’s wrist and turns it into a beats-per-minute heart reading. In this case, the Apple Watch’s heart rate readings were “perfectly in sync” with the emergency room’s monitory, Houle said.

The future of fitness trackers

The fitness tracking industry is expected to grow $50 billion by 2018, and cases such as the Apple Watch will only contribute to more individuals monitoring their health.

READ RELATED: Google takes a step further into health care with new fitness tracker

Fitness trackers are new-generation pedometers that sense motion, sync wirelessly with smartphones, measure the user’s activity and heart rate and so much more. Other conditions that can be detected by fitness trackers with heart rate monitoring capabilities include atrial fibrillation (erratic heartbeats), anemia and an overactive thyroid as this can also cause a faster heart beat.

Health trackers aren’t just for consumers, as Google X recently reported it is designing a health tracker designed just for doctors. The health tracking wristband is intended to be used in clinical trials and drug tests.

Many doctors believe that 50 percent of diseases go from bad to worse because of improper or late diagnosis. Google is hoping to change this statistic however by creating a technology that can extract continuous medical-grade information about the wearer. Doctors can then study and understand recurring patterns of diseases and find the best solution to combat them.

RELATED TOPIC: How Google and Novartis are shaping health tech

It makes sense that health trackers will only continue to improve and offer more potentially life-saving apps. But at the end of the day, whether it's detecting conditions early or monitoring conditions, there are a lot of advantages to wearables.

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[Source: Huffington Post]

 

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Jun 18, 2021

Intelliwave SiteSense boosts APTIM material tracking

APTIM
Intelliwave
3 min
Intelliwave Technologies outlines how it provides data and visibility benefits for APTIM

“We’ve been engaged with the APTIM team since early 2019 providing SiteSense, our mobile construction SaaS solution, for their maintenance and construction projects, allowing them to track materials and equipment, and manage inventory.

We have been working with the APTIM team to standardize material tracking processes and procedures, ultimately with the goal of reducing the amount of time  spent looking for materials. Industry studies show that better management of materials can lead to a 16% increase in craft labour productivity.

Everyone knows construction is one of the oldest industries but it’s one of the least tech driven comparatively. About 95% of Engineering and Construction data captured goes unused, 13% of working hours are spent looking for data and around 30% of companies have applications that don’t integrate. 

With APTIM, we’re looking at early risk detection, through predictive analysis and forecasting of material constraints, integrating with the ecosystem of software platforms and reporting on real-time data with a ‘field-first’ focus – through initiatives like the Digital Foreman. The APTIM team has seen great wins in the field, utilising bar-code technology, to check in thousands of material items quickly compared to manual methods.

There are three key areas when it comes to successful Materials Management in the software sector – culture, technology, and vendor engagement.

Given the state of world affairs, access to data needs to be off site via the cloud to support remote working conditions, providing a ‘single source of truth’ accessed by many parties; the tech sector is always growing, so companies need faster and more reliable access to this cloud data; digital supply chain initiatives engage vendors a lot earlier in the process to drive collaboration and to engage with their clients, which gives more assurance as there is more emphasis on automating data capture. 

It’s been a challenging period with the pandemic, particularly for the supply chain. Look what happened in the Suez Canal – things can suddenly impact material costs and availability, and you really have to be more efficient to survive and succeed. Virtual system access can solve some issues and you need to look at data access in a wider net.

Solving problems comes down to better visibility, and proactively solving issues with vendors and enabling construction teams to execute their work. The biggest cause of delays is not being able to provide teams with what they need.

On average 2% of materials are lost or re-ordered, which only factors in the material cost, what is not captured is the duplicated effort of procurement, vendor and shipping costs, all of which have an environmental impact.

As things start to stabilise, APTIM continues to utilize SiteSense to boost efficiencies and solve productivity issues proactively. Integrating with 3D/4D modelling is just the precipice of what we can do. Access to data can help you firm up bids to win work, to make better cost estimates, and AI and ML are the next phase, providing an eco-system of tools.

A key focus for Intelliwave and APTIM is to increase the availability of data, whether it’s creating a data warehouse for visualisations or increasing integrations to provide additional value. We want to move to a more of an enterprise usage phase – up to now it’s been project based – so more people can access data in real time.

 

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