May 19, 2020

39 (and Counting) Major High Tech CEOs Demand Revision of Civil Rights Laws to Include LGBT Protection

LGBT
CEOs
law
Tech
Tomas H. Lucero
2 min
39 (and Counting) Major High Tech CEOs Demand Revision of Civil Rights Laws to Include LGBT Protection

American high tech business leaders believe that religious freedom, inclusion, and diversity can co-exist and everyone including LGBT people and people of faith should be protected under their states’ civil rights laws. To this effect, a growing number of high profile tech CEOs—including those from Twitter and eBay—led by Affirm CEO Max Levchin, have issued a joint statement in response to a recent host of anti-LGBT bills pending or signed in to law in states around the country. The joint statement calls on all state legislatures to add sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes to their civil rights laws and to explicitly forbid discrimination or denial of services to anyone.

For Levchin, it’s high time that LGBT peoples be fully protected from all discrimination: “If anything can be learned from the battle for fairness and equality in Indiana, Arkansas, and other states, it’s that LGBT people deserve to be protected from unjust discrimination.

For Chad Griffin, President of the Human Rights Campaign—America’s largest civil rights organization working to achieve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality—the call by high tech to protect LGBT peoples is also an important statement about the availability of jobs. “These leaders have made it clear: if states want high tech jobs, they must put fully inclusive nondiscrimination protections in place immediately," he said.

For these leaders, the values of diversity, fairness and equality are central to their industry. “These values fuel creativity and inspiration, and those in turn make the U.S. technology sector the most admired in the world today,” reads their statement.

Finally, these leaders are adamant about their proposal for states to amend their civil rights laws to protect LGBT peoples. “Anything less will only serve to place barriers between people, create hurdles to creativity and inclusion, and smother the kind of open and transparent society that is necessary to create the jobs of the future. Discrimination is bad for business and that’s why we've taken the time to join this joint statement,” they write.

Related Story: 5 Leadership Tips from Chevron CEO John Watson

Related Story: Is Your Company Plugged in to the Right Tech Products?

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter!

Read our latest edition - Business Review USA 

Share article

May 12, 2021

How innovation is transforming government

United States Air Force
Leidos
Bizclik Editor
3 min
Leidos is a global leader in the development and application of technology to solve their customers’ most demanding challenges.

According to Washington Technology’s Top 100 list, Leidos is the largest IT provider to the government. But as Lieutenant General William J. Bender explains, “that barely scratches the surface” of the company’s portfolio and drive for innovation.

Bender, who spent three and a half decades in the military, including a stint as the U.S. Air Force’s Chief Information Officer (CIO), has seen action in the field and in technology during that time, and it runs in the family. Bender’s son is an F-16 instructor pilot. So it stands to reason Bender Senior intends to ensure a thriving technological base for the U.S. Air Force. “What we’re really doing here is transforming the federal government from the industrial age into the information age and doing it hand-in-hand with industry,” he says.

The significant changes that have taken place in the wider technology world are precisely the capabilities Leidos is trying to pilot the U.S. Air Force through. It boils down to developing cyberspace as a new domain of battle, globally connected and constantly challenged by the threat of cybersecurity attacks.

“We recognize the importance of the U.S. Air Force’s missions,” says Bender, “and making sure they achieve those missions. We sit side-by-side with the air combat command, intelligence surveillance, and reconnaissance infrastructure across the Air Force. There are multiple large programs where the Air Force is partnering with Leidos to ensure their mission is successfully accomplished 24/7/365. In this company, we’re all in on making sure there’s no drop in capability.”

That partnership relies on a shared understanding of delivering successful national security outcomes, really understanding the mission at hand, and Leidos’ long-standing relationship of over 50 years with the federal government.

To look at where technology is going, Bender thinks it is important to look back at the last 10 to 15 years. “What we’ve seen is a complete shift in how technology gets developed,” he says. “It used to be that the government invested aggressively in research and development, and some of those technologies, once they were launched in a military context, would find their way into the commercial space. That has shifted almost a hundred percent now, where the bulk of the research and development dollars and the development of tech-explicit technologies takes place in the commercial sector.”

“There’s a long-standing desire to adopt commercial technology into defense applications, but it’s had a hard time crossing the ‘valley of death’ [government slang for commercial technologies and partnerships that fail to effectively transition into government missions]. Increasingly we’re able to do that. We need to look at open architectures and open systems for a true plug-and-play capability. Instead of buying it now and trying to guess what it’s going to be used for 12 years from now, it should be evolving iteratively.”

 

Share article