May 19, 2020

Costolo outlines Twitter’s direction to go mainstream with capital M

Facebook
Twitter
Social Media
Dick Costolo
Tomás H. Lucero
2 min
Costolo outlines Twitter’s direction to go mainstream with capital M

As of the first quarter of 2015, Twitter averaged 236 million monthly active users, according to Statista. Those are big numbers, mainstream numbers. However, they are not mainstream with a capital M numbers. By comparison, Facebook has 1.44 billion monthly active users as of March 31. This difference is one that Twitter—read the firm’s investors—wants to see significantly shrunk. They want the micro-blogging social media site to become a “global” network on a massive scale.

Related Story: Does My Business Need Twitter?

In a recent question and answer session at the Code conference in Southern California, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo, talked about what Twitter needs to do to secure its future as a product. Quoted in Tech Crunch, he said, “It’s all about migrating a company from a world of being tech-centric, follow-based, reverse-chronologic-centric to a mix of that and curated, media-centric relevance-based content,” he said. The writing is on the wall: Twitter is moving towards more curation, relevance and media.

Related Story: Integrating Twitter and Facebook Marketing in your Business

Reporters who follow Twitter closely, like Matthew Panzarino (@panzer), saw this coming, but also have some original insight. Writing in Tech Crunch, Panzarino says, “We’re going to see a more algorithmic and curated Twitter alongside the ‘chronological’ Twitter that early users have come to know and (sometimes) love.”

Related Story: Building brands through Twitter

Panzarino thinks that the coming changes will be unpalatable for long-term users but necessary for Twitter to break out. “That mix may not please long-time users who are in love with a real-time chronological feed, but they’re a necessary change in order for Twitter to reach the scale and breadth of surface area it needs to monetize and to serve a larger, less tech-centric, audience,” he writes.

These are the growing pains of a firm on the threshold of its next growth cycle.

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May 14, 2021

Driving Federal IT Transformation

U.S Air Force
Dell
Dell Technologies
2 min
Dell Technologies and the USAF: partners in IT modernization.

Dell Technologies and the U.S. Air Force have a longstanding partnership. On several programs of record, Dell Technologies supports mission-oriented areas, including providing data-centric applications for platforms that the Air Force leverages in testing and operations. For example, certain high-performance jet fighters rely on Dell Technologies software that helps provide critical information about aircraft performance to the service and the aircraft manufacturer. After a test flight, data modules gathered from the aircraft’s sensors are downloaded, processed and analyzed to provide critical insights.

The Air Force has also made a concerted effort to drive technology to the edge so that warfighters can gain value from their data where it lives. Dell Technologies is enabling dynamic decision-making at the edge, where collection, management, analysis, and the distribution of data is critical. Dell Technologies’ software factories are supporting some of the largest Air Force programs, like Kessel Run and Kobayashi Maru.

Kobayashi Maru is a cloud-based program designed to modernize the way the Air Force (now the U.S. Space Force) interacts with its allies. By the time Kobayashi Maru was a program, the service had a year or two of experience with the highly successful Kessel Run. According to the Air Force, this continuous user-centered approach enabled warfighters to quickly evaluate software improvements, provide direct feedback to Kessel Run developers, and rapidly iterate the software to provide maximum value and impact. Kobayashi Maru operates under the same principle: the existing software procurement process is too slow to satisfy requirements, so leverage best practices and partner with industry (in this case, Dell Technologies) to get new systems into the field as quickly as possible.

The U.S. Air Force is committed to IT modernization, as exemplified by its ability to embrace change and transformation in how critical systems are procured and deployed. And Dell Technologies is committed to supporting the Air Force in its endeavors, so the service will always be ready for what’s next.

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