May 19, 2020

Verizon and AT&T announce Q1 earnings, iPhone 4 sales

Apple
AT&T
iPhone 4
Verizon Wireless
Bizclik Editor
2 min
Verizon and AT&T announce Q1 earnings, iPhone 4 sales

 

Verizon Wireless announced its first quarter earnings results this morning, disclosing iPhone 4 activations making for 2.2 million since the device became available on February 11. If you break down the numbers, Verizon activated almost 45,000 devices for the 49 days it has been available. AT&T revealed its Q1 2011 earnings, including 3.6 million iPhone activations, making for 40,000 activations per day for the quarter. We can even imagine the sorts of numbers that Apple is swimming in by not spreading out its mobile sales between the two most popular carriers.

During Q1 2011 alone, 5.8 million iPhone 4’s were activated, which is about 37 percent of the total 18.6 million phones sold by Apple. Reports are coming out that there hasn’t been that much of an impact, as of yet, regarding subscriber losses for AT&T. Last year, the iPhone was available from 151 carriers in 88 countries and has jumped to 186 carriers in 90 countries in this quarter.

See top stories in the WDM Content Network:
• Comparing Apple to the Rest of the World
• Top Ten Biggest Brands 
• Click here to read the latest edition of Business Review 

According to the editors at Beta News:
“For the purposes of comparing activations as percentage of total iPhone sales, the numbers are consistent enough and revealing for the previous three quarters. During fourth calendar quarter, the United States accounted for 25 percent of global iPhone sales, based on 4.1 million AT&T activations and 16.24 million units shipped worldwide by Apple. For the third quarter, when Apple launched iPhone 4, the United States accounted for substantially more -- 37 percent of global sales, based on 5.2 million AT&T activations and 14.1 million units shipped worldwide by Apple. For second quarter: 38 percent, based on 3.2 million activations and 8.4 million global sales.”



 

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May 15, 2021

M&A activity key lever for future tech sector growth

Technology
dealmaking
EY
M&Aactivity
Kate Birch
2 min
With M&A activity in the technology sector soaring, dealmaking is likely to be the key lever for growth as businesses look to recover post-pandemic

Despite the continuing uncertainty of the pandemic, the tech sector has witnessed soaring dealmaking activity over the past year, rocketing in the second half of 2020, with the last quarter of 2020 a record one for M&A activity, and momentum continuing into 2021.

Dealmaking in tech sector soars in past year

And the latest figures bear this out with the number of technology M&A deals totalling US$208.44bn globally in Q1 2021, according to GlobalData. While the US holds top spot both in volume of deals (1034) and total value (US$140.61bn), Europe ranked next with 649 deals (US$44.49bn) with the UK continuing its reign as Europe’s biggest M&A market with 204 deals.

In particular, megadeals – those valued at US$5bn or more – soared in 2020 representing 59% of all global technology sector deal value in 2020, up from 47% in 2019, according to the latest edition of the EY Technology Global Capital Confidence Barometer.

This tech sector trend towards megadeals is backed up by EY’s CCB data, with 16% of tech sector respondents planning to pursue transformative deals valued at US$5bn or more in the near-term.

While technology deal activity “all but stopped at the beginning of 2020 after fluctuating between historic highs and lows, companies pivoted quickly and tech M&A exploded in the second half of the year”, says Barak Ravid, EY Global TMT Leader for Strategy and Transactions. 

M&A activity level for tech sector growth

Looking ahead to the future, technology executives are optimistic, with nearly half (47%) expecting profitability to fully rebound this year, according to CCB data, compared to 23% across all sectors, and with more than half (51%) planning to pursue M&A in the next year in order to sustain growth.

According to Ravid, M&A activity is increasingly becoming a key lever for growth as businesses look to recover.

“To position themselves for future revenue growth, tech companies are now adjusting their M&A strategy to focus more on a target’s business resilience, digital technology alignment and to gain market share through consolidation,” says Ravid.

However, with an increasingly competitive deal market and ongoing geopolitical tensions, the majority of tech execs expect to see more competition in the bidding process for assets over the next year, primarily from private capital.

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